Transition To Digital Movie Post Production Pros and Cons
– Tim Sarnoff

10 May 2015

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Transcript:

By being able to do things faster we’re going to be doing it cheaper.  We’re not, we don’t do it for less, we just do it more times, we make it more perfect.

We have better ways of expressing ourselves.

Interestingly enough, doing it digitally almost increases the cost of production because now there’s much more we can do with it, but doing it digitally also affords us a whole number of new avenues of exploiting our films and our productions: putting it on the web, getting in front of different screens that didn’t before exist, so the opportunities for more of an audience to see what we’re creating exist because we’re doing it digitally.

But because we’re doing it digitally, we have more of an audience to send all our work out to, so one film might have as many as 200 different versions going on the same day in different languages, different formats, for different screens, in different countries different time zones, different delivery systems.

We weren’t sure when we started film we were going to start delivering it- we have to be prepared to deliver it everywhere all at once, sometimes like on the new Netflix versions where you do binge viewing.

We have to deliver an entire series all at once.

That didn’t happen before, so now we’re not we’re just about episode 1 going out, but episode 26 going out at the same time; and it doesn’t just have to go out in English, it goes out many languages with subtitles.

All that has to be done pretty much at the same time that we would normally have just sent out episode 1 in the past

This has expanded all of our efforts so that our team that used to be just one to three people is now 30, 40, sixty people trying to get a season out.

The whole notion that digital filmmaking made things simple is untrue.

Digital makes things look simple but it is very complex underneath, so we have spent a great deal of time trying to make that which is very complex underneath looks simple.

We want our filmmakers to make films, we want distributors to distribute films, we want our writers to write the films, we want them to know that once they are done with their part of the process, that they’re safe with us, that it will get to the next part of the process.

There’s been the notion that every vendor has a solution for how they make their part in the process simple, but the truth is there are far too few vendors that are actually involved in all of the processes, so although they may actually make their part in the process simple, their simplicity adds complexity to the overall chain: from on-set, to visual effects, to color correction to post-production, for distribution to any size screen.

Technicolor enables the audience to see and experience the filmmakers’ dreams with their eyes wide open.

Subscribe today…

don’t get left out of our news and analysis

Subscribe
Transcript:

By being able to do things faster we’re going to be doing it cheaper.  We’re not, we don’t do it for less, we just do it more times, we make it more perfect.

We have better ways of expressing ourselves.

Interestingly enough, doing it digitally almost increases the cost of production because now there’s much more we can do with it, but doing it digitally also affords us a whole number of new avenues of exploiting our films and our productions: putting it on the web, getting in front of different screens that didn’t before exist, so the opportunities for more of an audience to see what we’re creating exist because we’re doing it digitally.

But because we’re doing it digitally, we have more of an audience to send all our work out to, so one film might have as many as 200 different versions going on the same day in different languages, different formats, for different screens, in different countries different time zones, different delivery systems.

We weren’t sure when we started film we were going to start delivering it- we have to be prepared to deliver it everywhere all at once, sometimes like on the new Netflix versions where you do binge viewing.

We have to deliver an entire series all at once.

That didn’t happen before, so now we’re not we’re just about episode 1 going out, but episode 26 going out at the same time; and it doesn’t just have to go out in English, it goes out many languages with subtitles.

All that has to be done pretty much at the same time that we would normally have just sent out episode 1 in the past

This has expanded all of our efforts so that our team that used to be just one to three people is now 30, 40, sixty people trying to get a season out.

The whole notion that digital filmmaking made things simple is untrue.

Digital makes things look simple but it is very complex underneath, so we have spent a great deal of time trying to make that which is very complex underneath looks simple.

We want our filmmakers to make films, we want distributors to distribute films, we want our writers to write the films, we want them to know that once they are done with their part of the process, that they’re safe with us, that it will get to the next part of the process.

There’s been the notion that every vendor has a solution for how they make their part in the process simple, but the truth is there are far too few vendors that are actually involved in all of the processes, so although they may actually make their part in the process simple, their simplicity adds complexity to the overall chain: from on-set, to visual effects, to color correction to post-production, for distribution to any size screen.

Technicolor enables the audience to see and experience the filmmakers’ dreams with their eyes wide open.

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