Collaborative Digital Film Production Improves Global Communication
– Tim Sarnoff

10 May 2015

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Transcript:

Historically, filmmaking has been a serial process, and because of digital production we now do many of our projects; in parallel we capture, and we edit, and we do the effects all at the same time.

Sometimes a director is looking at the work on set while somewhere far, far away, maybe a different continent; the people in the visual effects facility are looking at those same dailies and deciding what they’re going to do with them.

We sometimes connect with each other at the time of filming to say maybe one more shot because we can do it better this way, or maybe that’s good enough because we can handle it from here.

That didn’t happen in the past because in the past you didn’t know what you got and were told a day or two later, but today not only do we know we have the moment we get, but we know what we’re going to get from it at the same time; so we will be working on a film in various locations all at the same time.

We can’t fix time zones but we can be working in India, in Chicago, in Los Angeles, in London, all at once, with operators, with different portions of the business communicating with each other all at once, so that when we end up with the end film it truly is a global effort, it’s no longer a small crew and even if it is a small crew it’s a global small crew.

Because there are so many different versions now in our films as we are making them, there are different drafts that are going on in different facilities.

We spanned a disproportionate amount of our time, trying to make sure that which we are working on is still something that’s going to be in the film itself.

We don’t now have a single structured system that affords everyone, at every time, every process, the same information, so often where films go array is that some people are working on a prior version, some people are working on cut version, some people aren’t working on the right version at all.

For us at Technicolor, we make sure that all the processes are interconnected, that the communication is linked, that when we check something out it’s the thing that’s current, when we check it back in we make sure that’s the new thing that’s current.

We have a very strong production management structure within all of our systems; we’ve integrated them together, so whether you’re on set, or whether you’re in visual effects, or whether you are in color correction or post-production, or distribution-to any size screen, we make sure that the process is connected.

Subscribe today…

don’t get left out of our news and analysis

Subscribe
Transcript:

Historically, filmmaking has been a serial process, and because of digital production we now do many of our projects; in parallel we capture, and we edit, and we do the effects all at the same time.

Sometimes a director is looking at the work on set while somewhere far, far away, maybe a different continent; the people in the visual effects facility are looking at those same dailies and deciding what they’re going to do with them.

We sometimes connect with each other at the time of filming to say maybe one more shot because we can do it better this way, or maybe that’s good enough because we can handle it from here.

That didn’t happen in the past because in the past you didn’t know what you got and were told a day or two later, but today not only do we know we have the moment we get, but we know what we’re going to get from it at the same time; so we will be working on a film in various locations all at the same time.

We can’t fix time zones but we can be working in India, in Chicago, in Los Angeles, in London, all at once, with operators, with different portions of the business communicating with each other all at once, so that when we end up with the end film it truly is a global effort, it’s no longer a small crew and even if it is a small crew it’s a global small crew.

Because there are so many different versions now in our films as we are making them, there are different drafts that are going on in different facilities.

We spanned a disproportionate amount of our time, trying to make sure that which we are working on is still something that’s going to be in the film itself.

We don’t now have a single structured system that affords everyone, at every time, every process, the same information, so often where films go array is that some people are working on a prior version, some people are working on cut version, some people aren’t working on the right version at all.

For us at Technicolor, we make sure that all the processes are interconnected, that the communication is linked, that when we check something out it’s the thing that’s current, when we check it back in we make sure that’s the new thing that’s current.

We have a very strong production management structure within all of our systems; we’ve integrated them together, so whether you’re on set, or whether you’re in visual effects, or whether you are in color correction or post-production, or distribution-to any size screen, we make sure that the process is connected.

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